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  2. One of the most famous of Behbahani’s poems, “A Cup of Sin,” reflects on the paradox of fear and hope:

    "My country, I will build you again, if need be, with bricks made from my life. I will build columns to support your roof, if need be, with my own bones. I will inhale again the perfume of flower favored by your youth. I will wash again the blood off your body with torrents of my tears." 

     

  3. Samuel L. Jackson, as Jules Winnfield from Pulp Fiction, as a hockey coach.

     
     

  4. (Source: blazepress, via shelbyjumper)

     

  5. Road trip!

     


  6. "Here´s a fun little cover we made. The year is 1996, Hosni Mubarak, the president of Egypt, appoints a new government, The element Copernicium is discovered, Michael Jordan is still every kid’s favourite basketball card and Donna Lewis releases this song."

    -Anna of the North

     

  7. peterfeld:

    Gazans children………….playing the funeral of a martyr…

     

  8. chrisdaps:

    I’m still really upset and angry. He did it once, the camera happened to be on him, he did it once and I think it’s the funniest joke that’s ever been on our show. - Michael Schur (x)

    Love this.

    (Source: chrisprattings, via wilwheaton)

     


  9. "Officers have tanks now. They have drones. They have automatic rifles, and planes, and helicopters, and they go through military-style boot camp training. It’s a constant complaint from what remains of this country’s civil liberties caucus. Just this last June, the ACLU issued a report on how police departments now possess arsenals in need of a use. Few paid attention, as usually happens.
     
    The worst part of outfitting our police officers as soldiers has been psychological. Give a man access to drones, tanks, and body armor, and he’ll reasonably think that his job isn’t simply to maintain peace, but to eradicate danger. Instead of protecting and serving, police are searching and destroying.
     
    If officers are soldiers, it follows that the neighborhoods they patrol are battlefields. And if they’re working battlefields, it follows that the population is the enemy. And because of correlations, rooted in historical injustice, between crime and income and income and race, the enemy population will consist largely of people of color, and especially of black men. Throughout the country, police officers are capturing, imprisoning, and killing black males at a ridiculous clip, waging a very literal war on people like Michael Brown."
     

  10. (Source: darachtheboat, via bdjackson)

     

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  12. kohenari:

    The photos and information coming out of Ferguson, MO this evening are shocking.

    SWAT teams clearing out fast food restaurants, journalists arrested, full-scale police-as-military response to non-violent protest.

    And yet perhaps the most amazing thing is that there seem not to be any elected officials willing to tell this police force to stand down.

     


  13. new scientific study from Princeton researcher Martin Gilens and Northwestern researcher Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

    An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

    For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

    It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

    That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

     


  14. "I don’t mind being introduced based on what I do, but I would argue an introduction opening a window to who I am would be refreshing for both parties.

    What if instead of introducing your friend as Jennifer the nurse, you started introducing her as Jennifer, one of most thoughtful people you know, or Jennifer the friend who helped you move in when you didn’t know a soul in this city.

    Introducing your friends for who they are rather than focusing on what they do will remind them they are loved before and beyond their titles. It’s an easy way to remind them that you see them for their hearts instead of their accomplishments.”

     

  15. Meet my patient population.